The Spell of The Sensuous

This semester our IDS 400 professor has assigned some heavy reading material. One book in particular, “The Spell of the Sensuous,” by David Abram, who is an American philosopher, sleight-of-hand magician, performer, and cultural ecologist, is extremely complex. This book is interesting, yet mind boggling because Abram stews together the concepts of perception, philosophy, culture, magic, language and ritual into one big pot within this book. From my own personal perception, it seems that Abram attempts to get his audience to question what each human-being views as their own unique and individual reality. This book highlights how our realities are related and how they differ based on personal experiences, culture and language, which is usually passed down from one generation to the next. Abram utilizes the work of Edmund Hussel and Maurice Merleau-Ponty, who were philosphers during the twentith century. Husserl inaugurated the phiolospical discipline of phenomenology. During the 1900s, Husserl argued that phenomenology would turn toward “the things themselves,” toward the world as it is experienced in its felt immediacy. Phenomenology, which is also defined as the science of experience, is a theory  based on the concept of intersubjectivity, which differs from one person to the next and is particpatory in nature. Ponty illustrates this point by stating that through all his knowlege of the world, even scientifc knowlege, is gained from his own particular point of view or personal experience. (Abrams, 1996). I can relate to his statement based on the fact that my own reality constantly changes dependant on what I may be experiencing from one day to the next.

Published by: Sage Scholar

Hi, I’m Precious McNeil. I’m a intuitive scholar, freethinker, researcher, aspiring herbalist, and social justice advocate, who loves to travel and spend time in nature. ©2021 Precious McNeil: Creative Intelligence. All rights reserved.

Categories UncategorizedLeave a comment

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s